Mountain Peak Paranormal Investigations

Paranormal Investigations and Research

Category Archives: District Museum

District Museum Assay Office Investigation Suspected Picture

On July 10, 2011 MPPIR held its first public ghost investigation at the Cripple Creek District Museum.  This museum consists of 3 buildings, the Midland Terminal, the Assay Office and the Trade and Transfer Company.

While in the Assay office 2 guests, Jan, Ric and me where investigating the front part of the building.  During this time Ric and Jan (the Museum Director) where discussing feelings they had concerning the front door way.  They had the feeling that some-one was going in and out the door.  I began to snap off a series of photos of the direction of Ric as he was standing near the door.

This is one of the 5 pictures that I took.  I have trimmed this pictured down to show you what I saw.

Suspected Picture

To the left of Ric and a bit taller is a white figure reflected on a plexiglass wall behind Ric.  I would normally just throw this picture out but I found some oddities with it.

One is that the reflection is facing Ric.  Two the Reflection is white.  There should be a red shift in the reflection.  If it was a reflection of Ric it would be a mirror of him.  Its not.

The picture itself gives me the creeps.  I have yet to explain this picture and why there would be a figure in the plexiglass wall like that.

To see the full image click on the image and a slide show should come up that has the original image and the one I posted.

For those who would like it here is the camera info for the original picture.

File Name    Frank Copley_07_10_2011_IMG_0955_SUSPECT.JPG
Camera Model    Canon EOS REBEL T2i
Firmware    Firmware Version 1.0.9
Shooting Date/Time    7/10/2011 8:55:49 PM
Author    Frank Copley
Copyright Notice    Frank Copley
Owner's Name    Frank Copley
Shooting Mode    Program AE
Tv( Shutter Speed )    0.6
Av( Aperture Value )    3.5
Metering Mode    Evaluative Metering
Exposure Compensation    0
ISO Speed    12800
Auto ISO Speed    OFF
Lens    EF-S18-55mm f/3.5-5.6
Focal Length    18.0 mm
Image Size    5184x3456
Image Quality    Fine
Flash    Off
FE lock    OFF
White Balance Mode    Auto
AF Mode    Manual focusing
Picture Style    Standard
Sharpness    3
Contrast    0
Saturation    0
Color tone    0
Color Space    sRGB v1.31 (Canon)
Long exposure noise reduction    0:Off
High ISO speed noise reduction    0:Standard
Highlight tone priority    0:Disable
Auto Lighting Optimizer    3:Disable
Peripheral illumination correction    Enable
File Size    10540 KB
Drive Mode    Continuous shooting
Live View Shooting    OFF

©2011, Blog and Pictures Frank C, MPPIR

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The Assay Office – Cripple Creek District Museum Complex

The Assay Office depicts and explains the assay operation, vital to the gold mining industry.  Samples of ore were brought to the assay office to ascertain their  value in price per ton which was calculated from a small amount of rock.  It was a complicated but necessary process to find out if a location was profitable enough to file a claim. Men were made millionaires or paupers from the information from this process. This was the first place a miner took his find.

The Assay Office

The building on the Cripple Creek District Museum property, between the District Museum Building and the Colorado Trading and Transfer Company Building was a garage in Victor that was moved to the property over 40 years ago.

(Author’s note: The picture on the right does not depict a ghost.  It does depict the photographer.)

The Colorado Trading and Transfer Company Building

Front of building

Part of the District Museum complex includes a building on the southeast corner of Bennett and Fifth Street with the name of the business it housed,  the Colorado Trading and Transfer Company. The building was built by the Carlton brothers, Albert “Bert” and younger brother Leslie. The brothers came from a wealthy family in Warren, Illinois. When Bert developed T.B. he moved to Colorado Springs in 1889.  Leslie joined him and the brothers heard of the going’s on in Cripple Creek and rode their bikes up there to see what was going on. Not bad for a T.B. patient with the use of only one lung.

The brothers started a firewood and coal delivery business. By the time the Midland Terminal Railroad arrived in Cripple Creek, the brothers had established a business transporting ore from the mines to the terminal rail head. They built the building at the corner of Bennett and Fifth in 1894 next to what would be the Midland Terminal Railroad Depot. Amazingly enough, the building escaped destruction in the two fires that razed Cripple Creek in April 1896. The building standing there today is the same building, refurbished in the early 1990s with funds from the City of Cripple Creek.

Bert and his wife Ethel lived on the top floor until 1898 when they moved to more suitable housing befitting Bert’s financial position in the town as owner of the First National Bank in Cripple Creek.  They moved to the top floor of the bank. The building was sold to the Midland Terminal Railroad in 1899  to continue its purpose as a freight depot for the railroad.

When the town was in decline after the bust of the Gold Rush, Carlton, known as “King Bert”, bought back the building and the Midland Terminal Railroad as well. In recent history, its most frequent inhabitant that we know of is Jan as it houses her office as the museum manager. It is furnished as it would have been at the turn of the last century.

There is also a gift shop that occupies the front of the entire first floor. Nancy, who is a museum employee, told me that yesterday, as she was straightening the books on the bookcase shown in the picture below (the bookcase is on the right hand side near the window), a book flew out of the shelves and landed on the floor about three feet away from the bookcase in front of the table under the window.  The book was titled “Ute Indians”. Perhaps they are looking for attention too.

The back half of the first floor is part of the museum display of memorabilia lining the walls and cases with information on the people, places and events that made Cripple Creek history.

©2011, MPPIR, Blog: Nancy B, Photo’s Nancy B & Frank C

Cripple Creek District Museum — 2009 EVP’s Chap 2

Room the music was played.

During the same investigation where the MPPIR group spent time talking to a little ghost girl the sounds of a music box are recorded.

As a rule MPPIR members are not allowed to touch, move or play with anything in a Museum.  We consider museum artifacts an important part of history and anything that would put them at risk is not something we condone.  So when this music box started playing, to the astonishment of the investigators they thought it was the greatest thing.

Little did they know that not only was this a great piece of recording but it went beyond that!  As we found out later, there is only one music box in the Museum.  Its not located in the room in question and it is believed to be non-functional.  If it was working, researching into the broken box has lead us to believe this maybe the wrong tune.

Also the investigators swore up and down they saw the music box on the mantle place (see picture).  There is no music box on that mantle.   I will admit I took the picture a year later, but the Museum director swore that there has never been a music box displayed on the fireplace mantle.  Odd I say, because not only do the investigators see the music box, they can hear it too.

And now you can without headphones:

©2009, MPPIR, Blog:  Frank C, EVP:  Ric R

Cripple Creek District Museum
P.O. Box 1210 ~ 500 East Bennett Avenue
Cripple Creek, Colorado 80813
719-689-2634 ~ 719-689-9540
http://www.cripple-creek.org/
Email: CCDMuseum@aol.com

Cripple Creek District Museum — 2009 EVP’s Chap 1

I will start this one out with a short Ghost story as I (Frank C) remember it.

On one particular evening in 2010 while at my first paranormal investigation at the Cripple Creek District Museum while taking a break two of the Museum staff, Jan and Missie, started telling us a few of the ghost stories about the building.  Always loving a good ghost story I had to commit this one to memory.

Missie started out this story by telling me of a man who had been visiting the museum in the upstairs area.  Upon returning from the upstairs he stopped and informed Missie of a little girl who was running around upstairs.

Missie informed the gentleman that there was a little girl ghost that liked to play upstairs and that he should go over and tell Jan about how the man had seen the little girl.  Mind you there where no children present in the museum, living ones that is.  The gentleman proceeded out the door over to the Transfer Station building.  While the man walked towards the other building presumably to tell Jan about seeing the little girl upstairs, Missie phoned Jan to tell her about the man who saw the little girl.

Jan while on the phone with Missie looks out the front window for the man who Missie still sees walking towards the Transfer Station building.  The two buildings are not far apart and you can see the front door from one to another.

Jan watching for the man tells Missie she does not see the gentlemen walking towards her.  Missie exclaiming, “He’s right there!”.  Just as the man fads out passing the Transfer Station, vanishing right before her eyes on an empty sidewalk.

Jan never saw the man walking.

I just have to say you have to love it when one ghost tells on another!

Now on that note.  I don’t have the exact date and time on this EVP but I know it’s from the Cripple Creek District Museum from sometime in 2009.  Listen for the little girl.  It was after museum hours and MPPIR does not bring children along for investigations.

You might need head phones.

©2009, MPPIR, Blog:  Frank C, EVP:  Ric R

Jan is the Museum Director

Missie is a Museum Tour Guide and Historian

Cripple Creek District Museum
P.O. Box 1210 ~ 500 East Bennett Avenue
Cripple Creek, Colorado 80813
719-689-2634 ~ 719-689-9540

http://www.cripple-creek.org/
Email: CCDMuseum@aol.com
 
 
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